Visiting the Gravesites of My Great and Great Great Grandfathers

Celebrating my Irish ancestors today!

Voices of Ancestors

James Keegan Sr (1812 – 1879) and his son James H Keegan Jr. (1847 – 1927) were laid to rest in Chapel Hill cemetery in Trescott, ME. James Sr. immigrated to Trescott from Ireland in 1836. I had seen their gravestones on the findagrave.com website but I wanted to go there myself. I had hit a roadblock in tracing James Sr in Ireland. My cousin Teresa had visited Ireland and requested information about him from the Meath Heritage & Genealogy Centre in Trim, Ireland, County Meath. The Centre found one listing for a James Keegan born March 27th, 1812 to Pat Keegan and Elizabeth Keating. But the birth date for this James did not match the birth date on his gravestone (October 6, 1812). I noted that County Meath was misspelled on his gravestone as Meade, perhaps the date of birth was not accurate either. The Centre’s search covered 1812…

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Find Your Maine Mason Ancestors

In Maine, when a man petitioned to join Freemasonry, a three by five membership card was created.  You will find links to the nearly 200,000 cards that record deceased members who joined between 1820 and 1995 at mainemason.org. There are some newspaper clipping obituaries included.

I found my great grandfather William Means Sr. who was initiated August 19, 1878. His eldest son, Otis, was initiated in June of 1906. His youngest son William Jr. (Billy) was initiated in November of 1918. William Sr. and his sons were all members of Lodge 91 in Machias.

Dates of death are included, as well as notations if your ancestor moved to another state.

A great resource!

That Old Granny Magic

Appalachian Ink ~ Home of Anna Wess (and Granny)

Last night, in the darkest of early morning hours, I heard the call of a distant train. We all know what that sounds like. It’s unmistakable, like the voice of somebody you once knew. I heard it just as clear and plain as I did when I was a child, when we lived across the river from the railroad tracks and the Norfolk and Southern would sound her alarm as she sauntered by our quaint, coal town neighborhoods. Most of the time, the train’s call was such a distant nuance, like a dream, that we never even woke up at all. We got used to that distant call, and after a while, it became a part of us, a comforting and peaceful wail, an Appalachian child’s lullaby, faithfully reminding us that we were home in our warm beds.

IMG_2992

Despite the passing of time and the fact that I no longer…

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How to Access Maine Marriage Records

I had the opportunity to be a Genealogy “brick wall buster” at the MGS Genealogy Fair last July. What a great experience. They say, “In teaching others we teach ourselves.[i]” Likewise, helping others with their “brick walls” is an amazing process wherein the helper learns. One of my querists wanted to know, “How to find…

via Maine Marriage Records — Blog – Maine Genealogical Society

Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Partnership Agreement With the US National Archives

I’m a proud member of the DAR, a descendant of Joseph Getchell Jr. who fought in the first naval battle of the American Revolution. Nice to know that the US National Archives are partnering with the DAR!

NARAtions

Over the last decade, NARA has engaged in digitization partnerships to increase digital access to the records in our custody and we continue to look for opportunities to grow those partnerships. We are pleased to announce a new partnership agreement with the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR).

The DAR was founded in 1890 and is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women’s service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America’s future through better education for children.  To learn more, please visit their website:  http://www.dar.org/

The agreement is available for review and public comment on our Digitization Partnerships page.  To submit feedback, please email digitization@nara.gov or leave a comment below.

The agreement will be available for comment until August 4, 2017.

Please consult NARA’s Principles for Partnerships for more information about our digitization partnerships.

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Monuments to Lost Libraries

Moore Genealogy

Authors photograph 2017, Charles H Moore

“Whenever an elder dies, a library burns down.”

 

Most of us have heard the above saying in one form or another. If there is any truth to this saying (I believe it holds much truth) then perhaps the above picture is of monuments to these lost libraries. If you are the family historian, genealogist, archivist, or family story teller, some responsibility falls on you to try and preserve some of the knowledge held in these libraries. Far too many people will only be known as a name and two dates on a gravestone, with their life story soon forgotten. Most family historians believe that family lore, if not preserved, will be lost within three generations. In the case of my family as my research has shown it happens much sooner.

We have many ways to save and pass on our family’s history. We…

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