Marion Rier, Circa late 1930s

My Aunt Marion was born January 5, 1913 in Leominster, MA, the first child of Frank and Lizzie Keegan Rier. She lived in Lubec at 28 Main Street from sometime in the 1950s until her death January 11, 1974 at the age of 61. 

Related links:

My Dad James Eugene Rier

My Paternal Grandfather Frank Rier and the Rier Brothers from Germany

1913 Photograph in Lubec or Trescott, Maine

Seven women on an outing. What makes this photo so special to me is my grandmother’s elder sisters are in it: Winnie Keegan (Winnifred; 3d from right sitting) and Teresa Keegan (2nd from right sitting). One other name is written under the women sitting 2nd from left: Kate Knulty? I can’t make out the last name very well.

Winnifred was born in 1887 and died in 1918 at the age of 31, perhaps during the influenza flu pandemic. Teresa was born about 1888; date of death yet unknown. The Keegan women were born in Trescott but Winnifred lived and worked in Lubec by the age of 23. She was a domestic servant in the household of the Trecartin family. My grandmother, Elizabeth Keegan Rier, was their younger sister in a family of seven children.

It’s apparent these women love to be outdoors, one holding binoculars!

Related posts on the Keegan family:

Searching for Grammy Rier’s Parents and Siblings.

My Great Great Paternal Grandfather, James Keegan. 

Bringing Your Ancestors to Life: The History of Irish Immigration into Maine.

Visiting the Gravesites of My Great and Great Great (Keegan) Grandfathers.

 

 

 

Book Recommendation about Living in Maine

Old Maine Woman by Glenna Johnson Smith

A delightful book of short stories and essays, full of humor. I found myself giggling often!

Published by Islandport Press. Read an excerpt here.

About this Book:

Glenna Johnson Smith writes with eloquence and humor about the complexities, absurdities, and pleasures of the every day, from her nostalgic looks at her childhood on the Maine coast in the 1920s and 1930s, to her observations of life under the big sky and among the rolling potato fields of her beloved Aroostook County, where she has lived for nearly seven decades. The book also includes some of her best fiction pieces.

This book is available through the Maine library system.

Reviews:

“The writing in these essays and short fiction pieces is lyrical and steady, humorous and yet pensive, nostalgic but always optimistic. That could be a description that perfectly fits the author as well. ”
—Cathie Pelletier, Author

“These pieces are funny, profound and poignant, offering an honest, sensitive and nostalgic portrayal of childhood, growing up, marriage, children and single motherhood in Hancock and Aroostook counties.”
—Bill Bushnell, Bushnell on Books, Kennebec Journal

“Glenna captures rural Maine with great insight and humor.”
—George Smith, georgesmithmaine.com

 “This collection of essays and short fiction is fun and insightful to read. Her humour is endearing”
––The Miramichi Reader