Today is the Three Year Anniversary of my blog, Voices of Ancestors!

The first post on December 8, 2016 was entitled: This Old House: Secrets in the Attic. Since then, the blog has had 32,309 views from 18,163 visitors from more than 60 countries. 

Family stories truly are universal!

 

Family Photograph Circa 1940s

Lubec, Maine. Grammy (Elizabeth Keegan Rier), three of her daughters, and two sisters.

Pictured above L to R: Patricia Rier, Marion Rier, Grammy, Carollee Rier Dinsmore, Mary Keegan Foley, Teresa Keegan.

Related posts:

My Grandmother’s Sisters, Teresa and Mary Keegan.

Searching for Grammy Rier’s Parents and Siblings.

My Updated Ancestry DNA Results Arrived!

According to the Ancestry DNA website, my ethnicity estimate is based on the data that Ancestry collects and the methods used to compare my results to that data. Because Ancestry DNA is always collecting more data and their methods are constantly improving, my estimate may change over time. Read more here.

My ethnicity profile changed. The one surprise in the original results, received just eight months ago, was 6% Iberian Peninsula. That disappeared in the updated version. I can genuinely say that nothing is a surprise in my new results and reflects what I know from my genealogy research. My maternal ancestors (Means, Getchell, Berry, and Johnson families) descended from the Scots-Irish and the English. My Scottish ancestors, the Clan Menzies, were originally from Mesnieres in Normandy. My mother’s blond hair and blue eyes (and two of my sons) hinted at Swedish descent, although the percentage dropped from 35% Scandinavian to 10% Swedish. Vikings raided and settled in Scotland and Ireland in the 9th century so that makes sense. My paternal ancestors, the Rier and Keegan families, originated in Germany and Ireland, respectively.

I knew ancestors from both sides of my family immigrated to America in the early 1700s to late 1800s and settled in Downeast Maine (Machias, Machiasport, Trescott and Lubec).

It’s nice to see that my DNA results match the family tree I have been researching!

This is my original DNA results for comparison.

AncestryDNAStory-Sherry-220118

 

 

 

1913. The Means Family

Voices of Ancestors

This post has been updated with a full scanned copy of the Means Family notebook found here1913.Means

When I was in sixth grade, Mrs. Luce gave the class an assignment: write a story about our ancestors. When I got home that day, I told Mom about my homework project. I hoped to write about my grandparents and great grandparents. She retrieved a small brown notebook from a closet draw entitled 1913. Means Family. Compliments of John H. Means Boston to William G Means. William Means was my great grandfather. I knew the book existed for no one could grow up in my home and not hear stories about my mother’s ancestors but I had never read it, nor glanced at the pages.

I opened the little book and read the first page:

Our Ancestors

Our great-great-great Grandfather and family.

Robert Means born 1689 married Jeane Armstrong, daughter…

View original post 363 more words

5 Hidden Clues in the US Census — Amy Johnson Crow

The US census forms the basis of much of our family history research. It is often among the first things we search for when trying to answer a genealogical question. However, there are clues that are often missed. Let’s take a look at 5 hidden clues in the US census. […]The post 5 Hidden Clues…

via 5 Hidden Clues in the US Census — Amy Johnson Crow

Celebrating Over 20,000 Views From Over 50 Countries

In just under 16 months, there have been 10,718 visitors. Ancestor stories truly are universal.

A big thank you to all of you who have visited!

Country, Views

“United States”,18748

“Canada”,372

“United Kingdom”,143

“Thailand”,133

“Romania”,133

“Australia”,118

“Ireland”,72

“Japan”,48

“Spain”,40

“India”,32

“Germany”,27

“New Zealand”,16

“Netherlands”,14

“Trinidad & Tobago”,12

“Norway”,11

“South Africa”,10

“Poland”,10

“European Union”,9

“Kuwait”,7

“St. Lucia”,7

“France”,7

“Mexico”,7

“Brazil”,5

“Philippines”,5

“Greece”,4

“Turkey”,4

“Costa Rica”,3

“Serbia”,3

“Malta”,3

“Switzerland”,2

“Ukraine”,2

“China”,2

“United Arab Emirates”,2

“Egypt”,2

“Sweden”,2

“Suriname”,2

“Croatia”,2

“Russia”,2

“Pakistan”,2

“Denmark”,1

“Austria”,1

“Finland”,1

“South Korea”,1

“Morocco”,1

“Iraq”,1

“Italy”,1

“Malaysia”,1

“Hungary”,1

“Kenya”,1

“Saudi Arabia”,1

“Indonesia”,1

“Sri Lanka”,1

“Zimbabwe”,1

“Puerto Rico”,1

My Ancestry DNA Results Arrived Yesterday!

I am a DNA novice so I’m busy exploring what it all means: migration patterns of my ancestors from 1700 through 1925, and my DNA matches with 652 fourth cousins or closer. As yet, I have not figured out the meaning of 150 ethnicity regions and the numbers associated with them in my profile.

I am particularly fascinated by the 6% Iberian DNA. There is much to learn!