An Ancestor Break. A Book Recommendation about Vietnam and PTSD.

Fifty Years in A Foxhole by Charles Kniffen.

I belong to a writing group in Trescott, Maine, headed by Dr. Michael Brown. We meet at Cobscook Community Learning Center every two weeks. I first met Chuck Kniffen there, a few years back. Soon after he joined the group, Chuck and his wife made a trip to Florida and tented out in driving rain. Chuck had flashbacks on his “vacation.” After returning home, he began to write about his experiences in Vietnam and living with undiagnosed PTSD for most of his life.

His book has just been published. It is riveting. You will cry, you will laugh at Chuck’s unique humor, but most of all you will see with glaring intensity the true cost of war. The story is so relevant to the times we live in.

I have been involved with this writing group for more than three years and enjoyed our gatherings tremendously. I made friends who regularly support each other, as writers and in our personal lives. It a priceless gift. After joining this group, I began to write about my own life and stories about my ancestors, and writing eventually led to the birth of this blog.

Chuck recently did an radio interview with the owner of Sunbury Press, Lawrence Knorr. It is well worth the time to listen.

Thank you for your service Chuck. Thank you for having the courage to write your story. Congratulations!

Related posts about war veterans:

Lubec Veterans Honor Roll

A Great Resource To Find Your Civil War Ancestors  

 

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Lubec Veterans Honor Roll

LEST WE FORGET

This beautiful memorial honors hundreds of men and women for their wartime service. Lubec, Maine is a small seaside town at the easternmost point in the contiguous United States. In 2010, its population was 1359 residents. Despite its size, many sons and daughters of Lubec fought for their country in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The memorial also honors those who served their country in Peacetime.

Standing in front of the Memorial, gazing at all the names, I am in awe of the patriotic, brave men and women of Lubec.

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The names of my father, James E. Rier, and three of his brothers, Julian V. (Barney), Paul J. and Francis E. (Babe), are inscribed in black granite for their service in World War II.

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This memorial is situated in a lovely park, the grounds lined by canons, close to a statue honoring the sacrifices of the Civil War heroes of Lubec. Appomattox was the final campaign of the Civil War that led to the surrender of General Robert E Lee to Ulysses S Grant of the Union Army at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia on April 9. 1865.

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Related posts:

Dad’s Graduation from US Army Air Corp Advanced Flying School. 1942

Dad Received West Point Assignment as Flight Instructor. 1942.