Square Dancing and Gatherings in the 60s.

Downeast Maine. Pictured above L to R. Vivian and Vernell Leighton, Lorna and Carroll Gay, and my Mom, Louise Johnson Rier.

Who else remembers when our parents went to Square Dances? When I was in Grammar School, I went along with them and learned to allemande left and other steps called out that I know longer remember. But I vividly recall that a good time was had by all!

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The same group except Dad is sitting between Mom and Lorna Gay.

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A buffet dinner after or before the dance. I believe that is Millard Whitney in the grey sweater beside his wife Dot?

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A gathering at my parents home. I recognize Burt and Marion Bagley on the couch. Could that be Dot May Whitney in the blue dress?

Related post:

Mom and Friends. Rotary Anns Bowling Team Trophy. 1959.

 

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Lubec Veterans Honor Roll

LEST WE FORGET

This beautiful memorial honors hundreds of men and women for their wartime service. Lubec, Maine is a small seaside town at the easternmost point in the contiguous United States. In 2010, its population was 1359 residents. Despite its size, many sons and daughters of Lubec fought for their country in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The memorial also honors those who served their country in Peacetime.

Standing in front of the Memorial, gazing at all the names, I am in awe of the patriotic, brave men and women of Lubec.

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The names of my father, James E. Rier, and three of his brothers, Julian V. (Barney), Paul J. and Francis E. (Babe), are inscribed in black granite for their service in World War II.

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This memorial is situated in a lovely park, the grounds lined by canons, close to a statue honoring the sacrifices of the Civil War heroes of Lubec. Appomattox was the final campaign of the Civil War that led to the surrender of General Robert E Lee to Ulysses S Grant of the Union Army at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia on April 9. 1865.

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Related posts:

Dad’s Graduation from US Army Air Corp Advanced Flying School. 1942

Dad Received West Point Assignment as Flight Instructor. 1942.

 

 

Mom and Dad. Halloween Rotary Party. 1976.

Machias, Maine. James “Gene” Rier and Louise Johnson Rier.

Dad and Mom both had a sense of humor. This photo makes me smile. I especially enjoy Dad’s costume, his crazy glasses, red flannel dress, black stockings and a garter. Mom seems to be a ghoulish worker woman in overalls, red handkerchief scarf, cool mask and shower cap. They make an attractive pair.

Today, I can hear them laughing, and see them smiling.

This is another photo of a Halloween party, circa 1960s.

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L to R. Phil and Muriel Watts are in the Native American costumes, behind them ?, Connie and Richard Young (he’s a skunk!), Dad, and a lady I do not recognize beside him.

I know it’s Dad because I recognize the striped flannel shirt, and the coolest mask and wig ever. I used to retrieve them from Mom and Dad’s attic and scare my kids. Then they each took turns, ran around with mask and wig, and scared each other at random.

I wore that wig and mask to a Halloween party at the Grange Hall in the 70s. No one recognized me for the entire evening. It was great fun!

Related posts about Dad:

My Dad James Eugene Rier

Dad’s Futuristic Car. 1935.

Dad’s Graduation from US Army Air Corp Advanced Flying School.

Dad Received West Point Assignment as Flight Instructor. 1942.

The Beginning of A Business in Machias Maine. Rier Buick. 1949.

Rier Buick and Machias Auto Parts. Circa 1960s. 

My Dad, James “Gene” Rier: Maine’s Dean of Gas Engines. 1985.

Related posts about Mom:

My Mother Louise Adele Johnson.

Mom and Brother Robert on a Sleigh Ride. Postcard 1920s.

Mom’s Adventures in Portland: Horse Back Riding. 1942.

Mom at 16. High School Graduation. 1936.

Mom Hanging Out with Friends.

Mom Keeps Men at Stewart Field Air Force Base on High Alert. 1944.

Mom and Friends. Rotary Anns Bowling Team Trophy. 1959.

 

 

Discovery: More Details about Dad’s Military Service in World War II

My Dad, James “Gene” Rier, served in the US Army Air Corp from March 7, 1942 until December 30, 1945. I was surprised to find this letter among his papers along with other documents. It is a Statement of Interest in Consideration for Commission in the Regular Army. October 22, 1945.  I had no idea that he submitted this letter of interest for commission in the US Army Air Corp after the war. Perhaps it was a backup plan in the case he did not find a civilian job.

Note: Pertinent parts of this letter are transcribed below for easy reading.

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By October 29, 1945, one week after this letter of interest, Captain James E Rier, separated from the US Army Air Corp with commendation.

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Dad found a job at the mill in Calais where he worked for a year and saved the money to build a home and business in Machias. By January 4th, 1946, Dad, Mom and my brother Jimmy were living in Calais.

What is interesting about Dad’s Statement of Interest for Commission in the Army is the details it contains about Dad’s education, training, and his early work history. I thought I knew about all about it but I did not. He wrote:

I have attended the following schools or colleges for the indicated number of years and hold the indicated degrees:

a. New England Aircraft School – Airplane Mechanics Course, six months.

b. Hemphill Diesel School, Boston Mass, six months.

c. Army Pilot Training, seven months.

d. Pratt & Whitney Aircraft School – Engine Specialist Course, two months.

My professional or business experience is as follows:

a. Aircraft Maintenance Officer – Three years

b. Six years experience as auto mechanic and foreman

c. Two years experience as topographer and surveyor

My military record is as follows:

a. Commissioned at Brooks Field, Texas, 7 March 1942, per paragraph 14 GO 54.

b. Date of entry on active duty 7 March 1942

c. Active duty, commissioned service, three years and eight months

d. Active duty, enlisted service, one year five months

Former immediate commanding officers from whom an officer evaluation report may be obtained:

a. Colonel Benjamin J. Webster, present address, Stewart Field, Newburgh, NY, served under from 25 June 1945 to date.

b. Colonel Joe W. Kelly, last known address, AAF Training Command, Fort Worth, Texas, served under from 25 January 1945 to 25 June 1945.

c. Colonel George F. Schlatter, last known address, Stewart Field, Newburgh, NY, served under from 3 June 1943 to 25 January 1945.

Permanent home mailing address: Lubec, Maine.

Dad must have been receiving his mail at his mother’s home in Lubec.

Dad’s Separation Qualification Record adds more details of his military career.

Military Occupational Assignments

5 months 2 Lt, Pilot, Two Engined (1051)

4 months 2nd Lt, Pilot, Single Engine (1054)

35 months Capt, Flight Test Maintenance Officer (4821)

Flight Test Maintenance Officer. Supervised the inspection, maintenance and repair of single and two engine training aircraft in the production line maintenance section. Supervised the preparation of reports, forms and correspondence necessary in the administration of the section. Supervised the changing of aircraft engines. Performed all necessary test flights to check safety of aircraft. Totaled 1215 flying hours as First Pilot.

Note: Dad was awarded the Legion of Merit for his accomplishments as a Flight Test Maintenance Officer.

On the second page, Dad lists employment:

Auto mechanic at Diamond Point Garage, Lubec Maine from 1935 to 1937. (This must be his father, Frank Rier’s garage. I did not know the name).

Topographer – 35.725 – for US Engineering Department, Boston, Mass from 1934 to 1935. On survey party, making maps of flooded area, also map of area to be flooded by future dam built.

Dad must have done the surveyor work right after he graduated from Lubec High School in 1934, likely living with his Aunt Mary in Leominster, MA. He truly was a jack of all trades!

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Related posts:

My Dad James Eugene Rier

Quoddy Light (Dad’s 1934 Yearbook)

Dad’s Futuristic Car. 1935.

Dad’s Graduation from US Army Air Corp Advanced Flying School.

Dad Received West Point Assignment as Flight Instructor. 1942.

The Beginning of A Business in Machias Maine. Rier Buick. 1949.

Rier Buick and Machias Auto Parts. Circa 1960s. 

My Dad, James “Gene” Rier: Maine’s Dean of Gas Engines. 1985.

 

 

 

Dad Was Awarded the Legion of Merit Medal

a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements.

Today I found the citation letter sent to him and a badly damaged newspaper article reporting his Legion of Merit award.

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“James E. Rier of Machias who was awarded the Legion of Merit at the request of Gen. Carl A. Spaatz, Army Air Chief for ‘outstanding accomplishment which contributed to flying safety.’ Rier, a former captain in the Air Force, earned the citation while serving…”

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Pratt & Whitney’s first engine R-1340 was called the Wasp. It was completed on Christmas Eve 1925. Soon, it dominated Navy and Army Air Force fighter planes. According to the Pratt Whitney website, “in the 1930s, it made its mark on early commercial aviation. Charles Lindbergh shattered the transcontinental speed record in 1930 with his Wasp-powered Lockheed Sirius. Jimmy Doolittle relied on his Wasp to take his Gee Bee aircraft to new speeds. And, Amelia Earhart made history with her Wasp-powered Lockheed Electra 10E.” The R-1340 engine was produced until 1960 with over 35,000 engines sold.

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When I was growing up, once in awhile, Dad would take the medal out of the old secretary, open the velvet-lined case, and tell the story. During WWII, airplane engines were failing due to a design flaw resulting in downed planes and death of pilots. At the time, Dad was serving as Assistant Aircraft Engineering Officer at West Point, Stewart Field Air Force Base, in Newburgh, NY. He recognized the engine flaw and figured out the mathematical formulas to fix the design. A certain part of the engine was at an improper angle that resulted in engine failure in some planes under certain flying conditions. He said it was all about the math and inventing the right formulas to correct it.

There was another story Dad told about fixing the engine design. It happened before he was awarded the Legion of Merit. An Army General visited Stewart Field and held a meeting to determine who was responsible for fixing the engines. One of Dad’s superior officers tried to take credit for it. Dad found out in the meeting. He said it was the closest he ever came to throwing a man out a second floor window, but restrained himself. (Now Dad could have a temper at times but I never saw him violent with anyone, little less ignore military protocols, so this was a surprise to his young daughter.) When Dad voiced his strong objection as the man attempted to take credit, the General questioned this man and asked him to explain the formulas. He could not. He didn’t know anything about it. The General then asked Dad the same questions. Dad had memorized the formulas and explained how the change in design had fixed the problem.

I can find no information online about a problem with Pratt and Whitney engines in World War II planes but expect that information was not made public.

I’m horribly glad that Dad decided not to throw that guy out through the window. And, I’m gratefully proud of him for serving his country, for making Pratt and Whitney engines safer, proud of the man who grew up in Lubec, graduated from High School there in 1934, then built a successful business nearby in Machias, Maine.

This photo of a three star General (far left), Dad (third from left), and a man on the right, who may be an engineer from Pratt and Whitney, inspecting a plane at West Point.

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Related posts:

My Dad James Eugene Rier.

Quoddy Light 1934.

Dad’s Futuristic Car. 1935.

Dad’s Graduation from US Army Air Corp Advanced Flying School.

Dad Received West Point Assignment as Flight Instructor. 1942.

The Beginning of A Business in Machias Maine. Rier Buick. 1949.

Rier Buick and Machias Auto Parts. Circa 1960s. 

My Dad, James “Gene” Rier: Maine’s Dean of Gas Engines. 1985.

Summer Lilies

for Mom and Dad. And, my beloved niece, Jessica Marie Rier, who would have turned 42 years old this year, had she not been taken from us at age 5.

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A summer breeze blows. I pull a bit of long grass around the stones. And, think of my mother, father, and niece, and how love never ends.

Dad’s Futuristic Car. 1935.

Lubec, Maine, the most easterly town in the US.

Dad liked to build (and fix) anything. When he was 20 years old, he and his best friend Bud McCaslin built a futuristic car in his father’s garage. Dad (R) and Bud (L) posed for a photo beside the car, the garage and Johnson Bay in the background.

How cool is that? Happy Father’s Day Dad!